London Gazette

 

Govt And Union To Talk About Clockwork Jobs

May 15, 1885 ·

Officials from Her Majesty’s Government will hold talks with trade unions representing workers at the Department for the Advancement of Sciences to discuss concerns over job security.

The talks are to explore ways of averting strike action at several facilities currently working on the controversial Clockwork Project, and union demands for the restriction of  automated labour in the UK workplace.

Adam – Saviour or Sinner?

The Government is hopeful the development of automata will brighten the country’s economic prospects and lift many out of poverty. There has been interest in the project from America and China, where Clockwork labour is expected to be used in the agriculture industry.

Job Security

Job fears have been echoed by railway workers and miners, who believe that every form of  manual labour is threatened if the Clockwork Project goes ahead without the necessary assurances from the authorities. Other  unions will be watching the outcome of the talks, before deciding on next steps. Many fear it could escalate to a nationwide dispute if not handled properly.

Government sources say it’s hopeful industrial action will be averted and a resolution found, before the dispute spreads to other parts of the workforce. A special team of negotiators has been chosen to lead the talks, including representatives from the Church and industry.

Attempts To Stop Production

London Gazette has heard that work on the Clockwork Project was  hampered by last week’s theft of Ambinium from a government research facility, and it is now known that the mineral is being used to develop a battery to power the automatons.

The Police are still no closer to finding out who was responsible for the break-in, and a offering a reward to anyone that can provide information that leads to an arrest.

The talks, which take place in London on Thursday, are likely to determine the future of labour relations and the economic fortunes of the country.

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